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Many things are difficult when you are a Trump. Telling the truth, for instance, or touching your top teeth and your bottom teeth together when your mouth is closed. It is not necessarily surprising, then, to hear that members of the Trump family have had trouble voting, particularly considering their medium-to-low level of enthusiasm for the concept of representative democracy.

The New York Daily News reports that Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner, and Melania Trump all failed to have their votes counted in the New York City mayoral election last month. The First Lady didn’t sign the envelope on her absentee ballot, so hers got tossed, according to election officials. Ivanka Trump, who is apparently unclear on how the postal service works, didn’t send in her absentee ballot until Election Day, while Jared didn’t bother to mail his ballot at all. Following directions has always been a fuzzy concept for these people, hasn’t it? Can they do anything correctly? That’s not a rhetorical question; I am quite sure that they can’t.

Meanwhile, officials told the Daily News that President Trump’s ballot was fine—but they had not noticed, until a Daily News reporter pointed it out, that Trump had listed the wrong birthdate.

Trump, 71, was born on June 14, 1946, but his ballot application lists his birthday as July.

It was not immediately clear if the mistake would affect his vote.

Unknown is who the President voted for, although it is unlikely that he checked the box for Mayor de Blasio.

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This is not the first time members of the Trump family have faced challenges at the ballot box. Like a lot of New Yorkers, Eric and Ivanka Trump missed the deadline to register to vote in the state’s 2016 presidential primary. On Election Day last year, both Donald and Eric Trump appeared incredibly interested in their wives’ ballots, almost as though they weren’t sure quite what they were supposed to be doing.

And of course, voting is often hard for reasons that are way less stupid than not reading the boldface instructions on your absentee ballot as a member of the literal First Family—as we’re seeing in Alabama, strict voter ID laws, voter intimidation, and restrictions on same-day registration and pre-registration may end up being the deciding factor in today’s Senate race. Trump’s “election integrity commission” promises an even more sinister future.

It’s impressive, in a way, that despite facing none of the restrictions imposed on minority voters by their party, the Trumps have managed to experience this civic duty as an insurmountable challenge. Then again, they’ve always been good at finding common cause with regular folks.