Image via AP.

Republican Senator Bob Corker had some choice words for Donald Trump today following one of the president’s typical weekend tirades, accusing him of turning the White House into an “adult day care center” and later expressing concern that Trump will “set the nation on the path to World War III.” I guess that last one is more a terrifying truism than a sick burn, but what’s even the difference these days?

Corker, who chairs the Senate foreign relations committee, announced on Wednesday that he would not seek re-election in Tennessee next year, and promptly took the opportunity to imply that Trump is doing his damnedest to fling the country into “chaos.”

Trump took the comment in stride, taking a few days to cool down and opting not to engage with the insult, instead using his Sunday getting to know his forgotten son, Barron. Just kidding:

Corker, free from the burden of giving a shit anymore, hit back.

He later told the New York Times that Trump is treating his office like “a reality show,” and that his erratic, insane behavior could set the country “on the path to World War III.”

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“He concerns me,” Corker told the paper. “He would have to concern anyone who cares about our nation.”

Corker also denied that Trump refused to endorse him. According to a statement from his chief of staff, Todd Womack, Trump was in fact encouraging him to run again. Via CNN:

“The president called Senator Corker on Monday afternoon and asked him to reconsider his decision not to seek reelection and reaffirmed that he would have endorsed him, as he has said many times,” Womack said in a statement.

Trump told Corker he was going to endorse him the day the Tennessee Republican announced his intention to retire, two sources familiar with the discussions said.

So Trump’s a liar and a crazy person—nothing new there. But Corker is known among colleagues for choosing his words carefully, which makes this next revelation especially unnerving:

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“I know for a fact that every single day at the White House, it’s a situation of trying to contain him,” Corker told the Times.

“Look, except for a few people, the vast majority of our caucus understands what we’re dealing with here,” he continued. “Of course they understand the volatility that we’re dealing with and the tremendous amount of work that it takes by people around him to keep him in the middle of the road.”

On the bright side, at least Corker’s seat will likely be left in good hands. Oh wait.