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Former Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, whose campaign was derailed after it was publicly revealed he has a history of preying on teenage girls as a grown man, is continuing the hallowed tradition of bad man comebacks by considering another run for Senate. And his reasoning seems to be—if Brett Kavanaugh could survive accusations of sexual assault, Moore can too!

As Moore’s wife Kayla wrote in a recent fundraising email, her husband is not deterred by the many, many allegations made against him in 2017. “Judge Moore is not only fighting back in court against those who conspired to destroy his political career,” Kayla wrote, “but is also seriously considering another run for the United States Senate!”

She then compared her husband to Kavanaugh, writing: “It was no strange coincidence that only 10 months later these same false and scurrilous tactics would again be used in the midst of a very important Supreme Court nomination process of Brett Kavanaugh in 2018.” But Kavanaugh “survived,” she continued, adding, “The people have seen through the corrupt tactics of the Washington D.C. establishment out to steal their vote!”

Unfortunately for us and for the many good people of Alabama, it’s probably true that Moore could mount a successful return to public life. He barely lost to Democrat Doug Jones in 2017, and according to a mid-April poll that the fundraising email highlighted, 27 percent of Alabama Republicans would vote for Moore in the Senate primary today. If he does run, however, as some have pointed out, it may be a boon to Democrats.

“I think having Roy Moore for a nominee for any party is never a good thing, but I certainly think there is a particular advantage to run against a candidate who was that divisive and incapable of pulling his own party together,” LaTosha Brown, the co-founder of the group Black Voters Matter, told the Observer. “Divisive” is one way to describe an alleged sexual predator of young teenage girls!

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Moore should perhaps sort through his legal troubles first before contemplating a run for office. According to the fundraising email, he’s had to pay $200,000 in legal fees, the result of a defamation lawsuit filed against him by one of the women who alleged that he sexually assaulted her when she was 14 and he was 32, as well as his own defamation lawsuit against four of his accusers.

And maybe that was the pragmatic point of invoking Kavanaugh’s name—to help rake in donations. It’s certainly worked for other people before.