For a painful few months, presidential campaigns consisted of men and women in their 50s, 60s, and 70s attempting to participate in youth culture by singing top 40 hits and dabbing. Mercifully, campaigns have realized that they aren’t going to win favor by blaspheming things we used to fleetingly like, and have, for the moment, stopped.

But the National Republican Senate Committee is just getting started.

On Wednesday, the NRSC distributed a two-page memo urging candidates to recognize how influential teen sext app Snapchat is, and how many juicy millennial votes lie within it.

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The memo, obained by Business Insider, suggests ways campaigns can use Snapchat to get in good with millennials.

For instance:

-Use Snapchat to give a behind-the-scenes look at your candidate and the campaign. Where they go to eat, what they do before a speech/event, driving in the car from event to event – things people normally wouldn’t get to see.

-Snapchat can also be used to allow people to attend events without being there. You can snap them speaking to volunteers, going on factory or plant tours, or walking in parades.

-Let candidates be themselves. The more authentic, the better. Cheering for sports teams, visiting favorite local restaurants, and practicing interesting hobbies can all be good material for snap stories.

-You can also use young volunteers in your snaps by snapping them making calls, knocking doors, or just working around the office.

-Don’t make your snap story too long. Keep it to less than 45 seconds as best you can. The shorter the snap story, the more likely people are to watch the whole thing.

The NRSC has already experimented with the platform, like with this unsettling attack ad on Missouri senate candidate Jason Kander:

In other words, this is what it’ll feel like when bad Christians die.


Contact the author at joanna@jezebel.com.

Image via 360b/Shutterstock.

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