Earlier today the New York Times’ editorial board endorsed Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination. In the endorsement, the board described Clinton as the most “deeply qualified presidential candidates in modern history,” noting that this is their fourth endorsement of the candidate (twice for the Senate and again in the 2008 primary). The Times writes:

One of the most attractive parts of Mrs. Clinton’s economic platform is her pledge to support the well-being and rights of working Americans. Her lifelong fight for women bolsters her credibility in this area, since so many of the problems with labor law hit women the hardest, including those involving child care, paid sick leave, unstable schedules and low wages for tipped workers.

Mrs. Clinton is keenly aware of the wage gap for women, especially for women of color. It’s not just that she’s done her homework — Mrs. Clinton has done her homework on pretty much any subject you’d care to name. Her knowledge comes from a commitment to issues like reproductive rights that is decades old. She was well ahead of Mr. Sanders in calling for repeal of the Hyde Amendment, which severely limits federal money to pay for abortions for poor women.

In addition to Clinton’s position on women’s rights, the Times argues that Clinton is best positioned to handle growing tensions in Syria, as well as negotiate the increasing need for cooperation with China.

The endorsement notes Bernie Sanders’ “bold proposals” on issues like health care reform and bank regulation, indicating that they have earned him broad support from Democratic voters, but describes these proposals as unrealistic. “His plans ... aren’t realistic,” the editorial board writes, “while Mrs. Clinton has very good, and achievable, proposals in both areas.”

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While the Times’ endorsement of Clinton isn’t exactly a surprise, the board’s clear disdain for Martin O’Malley is. Here’s, perhaps, the shadiest paragraph to ever appear in The Gray Lady:

The third Democratic contender, Martin O’Malley, is a personable and reasonable liberal who seems more suited for the jobs he has already had — governor of Maryland and mayor of Baltimore — than for president.

In the Republican primary, the Times has endorsed John Kasich. They did not describe Kasich as “personable.”

Image via AP.