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Texas A&M University recently made history when they elected a student body president named Bobby Brooks, the first openly gay person to hold the position. Rick Perry is really unhappy about it.

Brooks’s win was somewhat controversial, but not because of his sexuality. Texas A&M’s student newspaper, The Battalion, reports that his opponent Robert McIntosh actually won the election by 750 votes, but was disqualified following rumors of intimidation tactics and a failure to disclose financial information for a campaign video he made. As the second place winner, Brooks took office. All of these decisions were made by their fellow students, who serve on a judicial court for student body government conflicts.

Okay, here we go.

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Rick Perry heard about McIntosh’s disqualification and likely yelled at an old mop he thinks is his secretary to hold all his calls. Then he penned an op-ed for the Houston Chronicle about A&M’s crusade against McIntosh all in the name of *shudder* diversity. After outlining the particulars of the loss and insinuating the charges against McIntosh were trumped up, Perry asks us to look in our hearts and admit to the rank hypocrisy therein:

Now, Brooks’ presidency is being treated as a victory for “diversity.” It is difficult to escape the perception that this quest for “diversity” is the real reason the election outcome was overturned. Does the principle of “diversity” override and supersede all other values of our Aggie Honor Code?

Every Aggie ought to ask themselves: How would they act and feel if the victim was different? What if McIntosh had been a minority student instead of a white male? What if Brooks had been the candidate disqualified? Would the administration and the student body have allowed the first gay student body president to be voided for using charity glow sticks? Would the student body have allowed a black student body president to be disqualified on anonymous charges of voter intimidation?

We all know that the administration, the SGA and student body would not have permitted such a thing to happen. The outcome would have been different if the victim was different.

McIntosh is thrilled to have a member of President Trump’s cabinet come to bat for him. “He made a compelling case which I fully support and continue to fight for,” McIntosh told The Batt, “Our campaign team won the election and was subsequently disqualified unfairly. Diversity, at it’s heart, is equal treatment of all, and we hope this situation is resolved in a way that ensures a fair and more transparent process now and in future elections.”

It should be mentioned that, according to the Washington Post, McIntosh is the son of a Republican fundraiser in Dallas who campaigned for Trump during the election.

Brooks hasn’t yet commented on Perry’s interest in his win, but the school’s senior vice president of marketing and communications Amy Smith told the Texas Tribune that though she has admired Perry’s commitment to A&M, she can’t believe he’s getting involved in the student government election process.

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“I would say that we respectfully disagree with his assessment,” she said, “and his understanding of the election rules of student body president elections doesn’t reflect the facts.”

“Honestly, we were just surprised to see that the secretary of energy would take the time to weigh in in detail,” she added.