Image via Foster Campbell for Louisiana

A runoff election for a Senate seat in Louisiana could help to slightly lessen the blow of the hold of Republican power in the House, Senate, Executive branch and potentially the Supreme Court of our government. Democrat Foster Campbell will face off against Republican John Kennedy in a December 10 election for the final seat in the United States Senate.

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On Election Day, a wide field of candidates campaigned for the seat, with Kennedy receiving 25 percent of the vote and Campbell 17.5 percent. The trailing Republican candidate Charles Boustany garnered 15.4 percent percent and Democrat Caroline Fayard received 12.5 percent.

While an easy Campbell victory is an uphill battle, many are noting that he does have a legitimate shot at an upset. Louisiana already has a Democratic (if pro-life) governor in John Bel Edwards, who replaced noted idiot Bobby Jindal at the beginning of this year. Additionally, with a national focus on this seat, Foster has the chance to pull wider support from the many Americans who are upset over the fact that, you know, the majority of people in this country did not actually vote for Donald Trump to be our next president. Republicans are already working to extinguish any possibility of a Campbell win.

Some are also considering it a preview of the rallying and hard work that needs to be done in the 2018 midterm elections to wrestle any bit of power we can away from Trump and his band of merry white supremacists.

Campbell served in the Louisiana State Senate for seven terms and worked as a teacher out of college. He is currently the chairman for the state Public Service Commission. On his campaign site, he touts victories helping to pass measures aiding domestic violence victims by waiving utility startup fees for those fleeing abuse and lowering the cost of telephone calls for inmates in Louisiana prisons and jails. He also advocates for “science based policies” to help restore the Louisiana coast.

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Perhaps unsurprising for a politician in a conservative southern state, his website is devoid of any clear language about women’s health rights and draws attention to his “Christian values.” Still, if elected to the Senate, he promises to fight for paid family leave and equal pay.

While a Campbell win wouldn’t flip the Senate in favor of the Democrats, it would hurt the Republican majority somewhat giving them a 51-49 lead instead of 52-48.

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You can donate to Campbell’s campaign here and those who are interested in volunteering can request more information. Finally, if you live in Louisiana, don’t forget to vote on December 10